Shana Udvardy

Climate Resilience Analyst

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Shana Udvardy is the climate resilience analyst with the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. She conducts research and policy analysis to help inform and build support to increase resilience to climate change impacts. Ms. Udvardy is a Certified Floodplain Manager, and holds a M.S. in Conservation Ecology and Sustainable Development from the University of Georgia’s Odum School of Ecology and a B.A. from Syracuse University’s Maxwell School. See Shana's full bio.

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Three Reasons Why the COVID Relief Executive Order Is Bad Policy

On August 8, in response to the Congressional stalemate on passing a coronavirus relief package and their failure to renew benefits to individuals who have lost wages due to the COVID-19 economic crisis, the President signed an Executive Order bypassing Congress. On the surface it would seem that the Executive Order solved the Congressional impasse and by doing so ensured that badly needed resources would be allocated to individuals who have lost wages due to the pandemic, right? WRONG. Here are three reasons why the Executive Order is bad policy: Read more >

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In the Wake of COVID-19, Congress Must Support Pre-Disaster Mitigation Programs

As Congress considers formulating economic recovery and relief packages for the nation, robust funding must be targeted to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) pre-disaster mitigation programs to help prepare and protect communities ahead of time, particularly African American, Latinx and Native American communities that are suffering the brunt of the pandemic in this dire time. Read more >

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Environmental restoration employees deploy a containment boom from a boat March 18, 2019, on Offutt Air Force Base. One-third of the installation was flooded and the boom was a precautionary measure for possible fuel leaks. U.S. Air Force photo by Delanie Stafford

Three Reasons why The Pentagon Must Address Climate Change as a National Security Threat

This morning, Pentagon officials will testify during a Senate Armed Services Committee  hearing on “Strategic Threats, Ongoing Challenges, and National Defense Strategy Implementation.” It has been reported that the hearing will likely focus on how the current Pentagon officials are Implementing the National Defense Strategy, a policy document that is a clear departure from previous administrations in many ways, not least in its omission of climate change as a national security threat. Read more >

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SOS Congress: Nation’s Flood Policy Is Not Keeping Up with Climate Change Reality

September is preparedness month and for good reason. It is a time when the Atlantic Basin Hurricane season is at its peak.

The National Hurricane Center is now tracking three storms, Hurricane Humberto, tropical depression Imelda, and tropical storm Jerry. Preparedness month provides the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) with an opportunity to focus the public and Congress’s attention on the need to prepare the public to extreme weather events. The reality is, we need to be prepared for extreme weather and climate change-related impacts year-round.

Read more >

Nebraska National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Herschel Talley
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High waters surround homes and businesses in the small town of Bucksport, S.C. as rivers continue to rise and flooded areas expand as a result of Hurricane Florence, Sept. 24, 2018. Photo: US Army National Guard/Staff Sgt. Jorge Intriago

Hurricane Florence Lessons Underscore Need for the National Flood Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2019

Congress has a critical opportunity now to reform the National Flood Insurance Program. Here are some of the lessons we can learn from recent hurricanes and other flood events that underscore the need. Read more >

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