Kristy Dahl

Climate scientist

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Kristina Dahl is a climate scientist who designs, executes, and communicates scientific analyses that make climate change more tangible to the general public and policy makers. Her research focuses on the impacts of climate change--particularly sea level rise--on people and the places and institutions they care about. Dr. Dahl holds a Ph.D. in paleoclimate from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Cambridge and Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

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Photo: NASA

Hurricane Michael Threatens Gulf Coast Homes and Military Bases

We’re watching as Hurricane Michael rapidly gains strength on its way toward the Florida Panhandle. Using the most recent storm surge prediction for Michael—released by NOAA at 11 am Eastern today—and property level data provided by Zillow, our preliminary analysis indicates that nearly 50,000 coastal properties are at risk of storm surge inundation, though many more could be affected by flash flooding and heavy rain throughout the southeast. Read more >

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Sea Level Rise: New Interactive Map Shows What’s at Stake in Coastal Congressional Districts

A new interactive map tool from the Union of Concerned Scientists lets you explore the risk sea level rise poses to homes in your congressional district and provides district-specific fact sheets about those risks. Explore the interactive map.

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Hurricane Florence: Four Things You Should Know That Your Meteorologist is Truly Too Busy to Tell You

Hurricane Florence is currently making its way as a Category 4 storm toward the southeast coast and is expected to make landfall sometime on Thursday, most likely in North Carolina. Here some of the climate dynamics that make Florence stand out amid our historical knowledge of Atlantic hurricanes. Read more >

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Extreme Heat and Wildfire in California

California is burning (again). As a climate scientist living in California, the state’s wildfires over the past few years, while startling, have not been particularly surprising. This is, after all, what scientists have been predicting for a very long time. But there’s a profound difference between being clear-headed and understanding of predictions and feeling existential nausea because  this is the reality we have created for ourselves and our children. Read more >

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How Many Homes Are at Risk from Sea Level Rise? New Interactive Map Has the Answers

Last week the Union of Concerned Scientists released a report revealing that sea level rise puts over 300,000 homes in the United States at risk of increasingly frequent, disruptive flooding in just the next 30 years. Along with the report, UCS published an interactive map tool that lets you explore the exposure of coastal real estate in your state, your community, or your ZIP code to chronic flooding, or flooding that occurs 26 times or more per year (an average of every other week). It also highlights the implications of this massive risk to our economy and the importance of both acting quickly to curtail our carbon emissions and using the coming years wisely to prepare for the changes to come. Read more >

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