Adrienne Hollis

Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist

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Adrienne L. Hollis is the Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist for the Climate & Energy Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In that role, she leads the development, design, and implementation of methods for accessing and documenting the health impacts of climate change on communities of color and other traditionally disenfranchised groups. Dr. Hollis works with environmental justice communities to identify priority health concerns related to climate change and other environmental assaults, and evaluates climate and energy policy approaches for their ability to effectively address climate change and benefit underserved communities. She develops and implements projects to document health impacts of climate change on communities of color, and ensures scientific information from UCS is communicated in a culturally competent and helpful manner to vulnerable populations.

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Adrienne's Latest Posts

Hurricane Laura damages home in Lake Charles, LA/FEMA

Did EPA’s Non-Enforcement Policy Cause Lake Charles Chemical Plant Fire As COVID-Climate Disasters Pile Up?

In Westlake Louisiana, near Lake Charles, a chemical manufacturing plant fire last week increased the public health threat environmental justice communities are already facing. The fire released chlorine gas into the air, leading to a ‘stay at home’ order for residents who had not evacuated in anticipation of Hurricane Laura. Because of that order, and directions to keep windows and doors closed and not use air conditioners, depending on their situations, people may have been at an increased risk of COVID-19 infection and adverse health effects from the chlorine gas, on top of the danger from Hurricane Laura. Read more >

FEMA
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Hurricane Michael

With Hurricane and COVID-19 Preparedness, Communities Are Damned if they Do and Damned if they Don’t

Hurricane season is arriving in the middle of a global pandemic. What is the plan? Read more >

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Retha Ferguson/Pexels

Researchers Find Deadliest Aspect of COVID-19 for People of Color: Racism

Environmental and economic conditions experienced by people of color are influenced not only by the environmental injustices of living in contaminated areas, but also by climate change impacts. Those impacts affect vulnerable communities first and worst, and this is exacerbated by COVID-19, which has ravaged the lives of Black, Latino and Indigenous communities. The underlying cause that runs through these issues is racism, plain and simple. Read more >

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US Air Force

We Need a New Normal Post-COVID-19 That’s Not a Death Sentence to Black People

During this pandemic, we constantly hear people talk about how happy they will be when everything ‘goes back to normal.’ Normal was a death sentence for Black people. We do not want to go back to that. Read more >

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Why Congress Must Invest in Environmental Justice and Equity in the Next Recovery Package

People of color. The elderly. Women and LGBTQ people. Low income families. These are some of the most vulnerable among us. As such, they must be the focus of Congressional attention.

A recent report by nonprofit Kresge Health has drawn a straight line from these most vulnerable people to the likelihood of living near hazardous waste facilities. They are more likely to lack economic stability, education, housing and transportation options and even safe drinking water. Congress has it in its hands to change this as it crafts its next recovery package. Read more >

Derrick Jackson
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